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Germany

Welcome to

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Offical name:  Federal Republic of Germany​

Capital:   Berlin​

Form of Government:  Federal Republic​

Area:  357,386 km²​

Population:  82.8 million​

Other major cities:  Frankfurt, Cologne, Bonn, Heidelberg, Stuttgart, Munich​

From half-timbered medieval towns, dense forests, ancient fairytale castles to modern cities, and home to some of the most popular car manufacturing companies in the world ,the  famous Oktoberfest and World War II history, Germany offers an incredible range of experiences for everyone.

Germany’s central and southern regions have forested hills and mountains cut through by the Danube, Main and Rhine river valleys. In the north, the landscape flattens out to a wide plain that stretches to the North Sea. The German Alps are truly breathtaking. Bavaria is a particularly picturesque region of Germany, renowned for its medieval castles and fairytale countryside. Germany’s largest wooded area, in the southwest near the Swiss border, the Black Forest, a mountainous region full of pines trees, is home to the cuckoo clock.

Germany is home of many  famous classical music composers include Bach, Brahms, and Beethoven. Writers and Poets are Goethe, Schiller and famous Scientist Einstein!

Germany has bucket-loads of experiences to offer when it comes to holidays! Here’s the list of some cities that you may like to consider to add in your bucket list during your holiday in Germany. 

Berlin

Berlin, the capital of Germany and the country's largest city, is a vibrant modern town, with an eclectic mix of new and classic architecture, contemporary art galleries, modern shopping malls, and the remaining of historical landmarks such as the Berlin Wall and the Brandenburg gate, creating an exciting contrasts.

The Berlin Wall

Originated in 1961 when East Germany sealed off that half of the city to prevent citizens from fleeing to West Germany, 

dividing  the city for almost 30 years. Most of the Wall has been torn down in 1989, but several sections are still standing for display. The longest remaining section is the East Side Gallery, where visitors  can admire a colorful chain of graffiti art including the top highlight – the kiss of the General Secretary of the Communist Party Leonid Brezhnev and GDR leader Erich Honecker.

Checkpoint Charlie

Check Point Charlie was one of the most famous crossing points between West and East Germany back in the day. Now the guardhouse and sandbags in the centre of the street become a popular photo spot for visitors in Berlin.

Brandenburg Gate

The Brandenburg Gate is Berlin's most significant landmarks. Once a symbol of a of separation between East and West Berlin, and now a symbol of unity and peace.

Reichstag (Parliment House)

After the reunification of Germany, the Neo-Renaissance palace underwent a 10-year reconstruction and finally became the meeting place of the German Parliament in 1999. The building has since been completely modernised. It has a glass dome, which represents the political transparency of the city. Visitors can look out from the glass dome to get sweeping views of the hustle and bustle city.

 

Alexanderplatz

The largest square in Germany, Alexanderplatz was the center of East Berlin life, but was transform to be the city’s main shopping and entertainment district at the start of the 20th century. Now home to the World Time Clock and the Television Tower (Fernsehturm), one of the famous remain of GDR’s concrete architecture.

 

Television Tower (Fernsehturm)

Located in the former East Berlin district, the Berlin Television Tower, known to locals as the Fernsehturm, was built as a Soviet symbol of power in East Berlin. It is visible from every corner of the city, making it one of the symbols of the city. The observation deck offers an incredible 360° view over the city and there’s also a revolving restaurant, which requires a bit of pre-planning if you want a table.

 

Potsdam Square

The Postdam Square was an empty no-man’s-land from 1945 until the fall of the wall. Now, a bustling square  dominated by the Sony Center, endless shopping galleries, skyscapers, lots of entertainment and nightlife.

Holocaust Memorial

A memorial to the murdered Jews of Europe. Below the sprawling memorial is an information center that houses the background on Holocaust victims , with diaries, letters, photographs and personal effects of some of the victims.

 

Unter den Linden Avenue

Berlin’s oldest and most stately boulevard runs east to west from the Musuem Island to the Brandenburg Gate. The Zeughaus, State Opera and Humboldt University are lined along the avenue.

 

Many of the historic landmarks in Unter den Linden were levelled or badly damaged during the war and were rebuilt or restored after Reunification.

 

Museums Island

The Museum Island, located in the middle of the Spree River, is a complex with an ensemble of the city’s five world-beating museums. These are the Altes Museum, Alte National Galerie, Neues Museum, Bode Museum and the Pergamon Museum. The Museum Island was awarded UNESCO World Heritage Site status in 1999.

 

Berlin Cathedral

Located in the Museum Island, the Neo-Renaissance style Cathedral consecrated in 1961, is the largest and one of the most impressive churches in Berlin. It offers an incredible view of the city from the top of the Dome.

 

Gendarmenmarket

The Gendarmenmarkt, one of Berlin's largest squares, located close to Friedrichstraße, Berlin's exclusive shopping street. It is dominated by three historic landmark buildings: the Concert House, the French Cathedral (Französischer Dom), and the German Cathedral (Deutscher Dom). During December, the entire square becomes the city's famous Christmas Market.

 

Charlottenburg Palace

The magnificent late 17th-century Charlottenburg Palace  was Berlin's oldest and largest Prussian estate. Now it hosts fine collections of historic porcelain, sumptuous tableware, the Crown Jewels and other royal items. In the Rococo New Wing,  visitors get a glimpse of the glamorous state apartments in which the Prussian Kings and Electors lived, and 42-meter-long Golden Gallery with its rich, gilded stucco.

 

Be sure to visit the Mausoleum with its royal tombs as well as the garden with elegant landscape that was inspired by the gardens at Versailles.

Black Forest (Schwarzwald )

Black Forest (Schwarzwald in German), is home to the cuckoo clock, the Grimm Brothers' fairy tales and world-renowned thermal spas. It is known for idyllic villages, peaceful mountain, glittering river, unspoilt lakes and dense forest scenery. It is the perfect place for quiet, scenic walks, and taking in the natural beauty around you. 

Lake Titisee

Lake Titisee is located in the Black Forest National Park amid thick forest in the foothills of Feldberg and Hochfirst. The lake is a popular vacation destination surrounded by the pretty town of Titisee-Neustadt, which is packed with shops, restaurants and spa hotels where many people go to take the waters.  

Freiburg

A city in the Black Forest, known as the "Jewel of the Black Forest".

Visit the Cathedral,  Freiburg's biggest sight in the city and one of the oldest and most beautiful in all of Europe. The gargoyles are not to be missed. Bächle are small canals that line the streets of the inner city. These canals were once meant as a way to fight fires in medieval Freiburg. The Old town hall was assembled from 1557 from many old houses. Since 2007 tourist information centre can be found in this building.

Bonn

Bonn, settling on the shores of the picturesque River Rhine, was once the capital of

West Germany from 1945 to 1990. The rich culture of this city is still thriving today,

and you’ll find that it’s packed with informative museums and interesting architecture .

Apart from its historical significance, it has plenty of green refreshing spaces like gardens

and parks. Bonn is also known as the birthplace of the famous composer Ludwig van

Beethoven in 1770.  He remains the city’s pride and joy!

 

Cherry Blossom Avenue

If you have the chance to visit Bonn in spring time, it’s a must to see the beautiful

Heerstrasse street filled with blooming cherry trees that will take your breath away.

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Beethoven House

Even if you have little interest in classical music, you’ll know something about Ludwig van Beethoven. The house located at Bonngasse 20 is where the great composer was born in December 1770. Beautifully preserved, his birthplace is now a museum full of invaluable memories of his music and his life.

Bonn Minster
One of Germany’s oldest churches, Bonn Minster is a magnificent Roman Catholic basilica with a rich history. It was built in the 11th century over ruins of churches and temples that dated from Roman times.

 

Münsterplatz 

The Münsterplatz square in front of Bonn Minster is Bonn’s biggest square, where you’ll find the soaring figure of Beethoven! During winter, you’ll have the opportunity to wander around the charming Christmas market around the square.  


The Market Square (Marktplatz) and The Old Town Hall  (Old Rathaus)

One of the oldest and most important Square in Bonn. The Old Town Hall  (Old Rathaus) with its elegant pristine white facade, can be found here, as well many pretty Rococo-style buildings.

Museums 

There are many museums to be discovered in Bonn. Some of them are unique and have drawn several million visitors to date. The most outstanding is the Museum Mile features 5 museums or The Art and Exhibition Hall (Bundeskunsthalle), holds exhibitions relating to art and cultural history from around the world; the Contemporary Art Museum (Kunstmuseum); the a natural history museum and zoological research institution (Museum Koenig); The Contemporary German History from the end of the Second World War to the present (Haus der Geschichte); and Deutsches Museum Bonn focused on modern technology.

Drachenburg Castle

Located a little outside the city, is the late 19th-century fairytale Gothic castle, perching high on the hill overlooking the Rhine Valley and Bonn. The Castle is surrounded by immaculate terraces and gardens, and climbing up the romantic towers, you’ll find jaw-dropping views!